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Reviews

Finding Sea Glass: poems from The Drift, Hannah Lavery

Stewed Rhubarb Press, 2019 £5.99

Knowing how to belong

The emphasis on Scots words in this pamphlet is essential in communicating Hannah Lavery’s message, with phonetic spelling and colloquialisms used to create a voice. So in ‘St Andrew’s Day, 2014’, she writes: ‘He hadne made it. I was what? No bothered? Aye.’

The tone is conversational throughout. This informality bonds the reader with the poet, helps us assume the perceived role of confidant. As a result, her outpouring of pain, grief and loss becomes more personal, more deeply understood.

Please find the full review here at Sphinx Poetry Reviews, Pamphlets and Features.

Reviews

The Bullshit Cosmos, Sarah Shapiro

ignition Press, 2019 £5.00

A bit of background first: Sarah Shapiro experienced a difficult education, growing up with learning (dys)abilities* and struggling to learn to read. The Bullshit Cosmos details her personal journey and the efforts she made to grasp and utilise language.

Shapiro’s poetry beckons to those who aren’t confident readers and appeals to those who are. She plays with form and uses rhyme and repetition for the sound they create to demonstrate the hardships faced by those with (dys)abilities, as shown in her first poem ‘Appleseed Reading Comprehension’:

Please find the full review here at Sphinx Poetry Reviews, Pamphlets and Features.

Reviews

The Hoopoe’s Eye, Mark Carson

Wayleave Press, 2019 £5.00

Coleridge described poetry as ‘the best words in the best order’, but in The Hoopoe’s Eye Mark Carson shows us that the positioning of each poem within a sequence is equally significant.

The pamphlet begins with a private correspondence informing us that there has been a flood. From here, the poet takes us by the hand to walk his journey, step by step, poem by poem.

Please find the full review here at Sphinx Poetry Reviews, Pamphlets and Features.

Reviews

The Stack of Owls is Getting Higher, Dawn Watson

The Emma Press, 2019 £6.50

You may not expect a Belfast-born poet to write so convincingly like a native of her travels in South East America. But in The Stack of Owls is Getting Higher, where many of Dawn Watson’s poems are set in Georgia, Tennessee and the Carolinas, she creates a strong sense of place through her use of vivid imagery, language and dialect.

Please find the full review here at Sphinx Poetry Reviews, Pamphlets and Features.